Hopper Academy, 2011

Dublin Core

Title

Hopper Academy, 2011

Alternative Title

Hopper Academy

Subject

Sanford (Fla.)
Georgetown (Sanford, Fla.)
African Americans--Florida--Sanford
Segregation--Florida
Buildings--Florida
Schools

Description

The Hopper Academy was the first African-American school in the Georgetown district of Sanford, Florida. Established in 1886, the school was originally named Colored School No. 11. A new building for the school was constructed at 1110 Pine Avenue in 1906. The school served the African-American community in the surrounding region. Although it was the first black school in Sanford, Hopper Academy only went up to grade 10.

While today it has fallen into disrepair, Hopper Academy remains a symbol of Georgetown, representing the enduring legacy of Sanford’s African Americans raising themselves through education. Hopper Academy served as a black elementary school for grades 1 – 6 from 1926 to 1961. Professor Joseph Nathaniel Crooms was principal of Hopper from 1906 to 1926, thereafter becoming principal of Crooms High School in Goldsboro. Key individuals who studied at the school include Harlem Renaissance author Zora Neale Hurston and Sanford’s midwife Marie Francis. In 1968, the Hopper Academy ceased to operate as a school.

Creator

Firpo, Julio R.

Source

Original color digital image by Julio R. Firpo, April 26, 2011.

Date Created

2011-04-26

Is Part Of

Georgetown Collection, Sanford Collection, Seminole County Collection, RICHES of Central Florida.

Format

image/jpg

Extent

280 KB

Medium

1 color digital image

Language

eng

Type

Still Image

Coverage

Hopper Academy, Georgetown, Sanford, Florida

Accrual Method

Item Creation

Mediator

History Teacher
Geography Teacher

Provenance

Originally created by Julio R. Firpo.

Contributing Project

Curator

Firpo, Julio R.

Digital Collection

Source Repository

External Reference

Bentley, Altermese. Georgetown, The History of A Black Neighborhood. Sanford: Reprinted by the Sanford Museum, 1995.
Flewellyn, Valada Parker, and the Sanford Historical Society. African Americans of Sanford. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2009.
"Touring Seminole County." Historical Markers Program, Seminole County Historical Commission, http://www.seminolecountyfl.gov/departments-services/leisure-services/parks-recreation/museum-of-seminole-county-history/about-the-museum-of-seminole-county-hi/museum-resources-historical-informatio/historical-markers.stml.
Delinski, Rachel. "Master Plan: Improvements on the Way for Sanford Neighborhoods." The Sanford Herald October 28, 2009.

Transcript

SEMINOLE COUNTY HISTORIC MARKER

GEORGETOWN:

The community of Georgetown, a suburb east of Sanford Avenue, and north of Celery Avenue was established circa to the early black pioneers who had made their way from Virginia, the Carolinas, West Florida and as far away as the West Indies.
In 1885, the first Georgetown school was located at the northeast corner of Seventh and Cypress Avenue. It was founded with $100 from the school board. Mr. McLester was the first principal, followed by Mr. Reed and later by Mr. J.N. Croms, who founded Crooms Academy.
Some of the first Sanford businesses owned by black settlers were in Tuckertown, which would later become the business district of Georgetown. In 1887, there were twenty-eight registered voters. Between 1887 and 1923 Georgetown supported five
(Continued on other side)

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Original Format

1 color digital image

Locations

Categories