Okay for McCoy Expected: Port of Entry Status Close

Dublin Core

Title

Okay for McCoy Expected: Port of Entry Status Close

Alternative Title

Okay for McCoy Expected

Subject

Frey, Lou, 1934-
McCoy Air Force Base
Orlando (Fla.)
Airports--Florida
Tourism--Florida

Description

A newspaper article about the development of McCoy Air Force Base. After the McCoy AFB was fully transitioned from military to civilian use, it still lacked the status of an international port of entry. As a result, international tourists had to use other airports in Florida, such as Tampa and Miami. Due to the growth of attractions like Disney World, Central Florida was quickly developing a larger tourism industry. It was important that the airport was able to cater to international traffic so that the industry could continue to grow more effectively. Congressman Lou Frey, Jr. (1934-) petitioned the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury to give special consideration to the City of Orlando's bid to change the Jetport's status and this measure was successful. The second part of the article is missing,

Source

Original newspaper article: "Okay for McCoy Expected: Port of Entry Status Close." July 14, 1976: Lou Frey Papers, Clippings Binder, Lou Frey Institute of Politics & Government, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.

Date Created

ca. 1976-07-14

Date Copyrighted

1976-07-14

Date Issued

1976-07-14

Has Format

Original newspaper article, July 14, 1976.

Is Format Of

Digital reproduction of original newspaper article: "Okay for McCoy Expected: Port of Entry Status Close." July 14, 1976.

Is Part Of

Lou Frey Papers, Clippings Binder, Lou Frey Institute of Politics & Government, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.

Format

image/jpg

Extent

185 KB

Medium

1 newspaper article

Language

eng

Type

Text

Coverage

Orlando Jetport, McCoy Air Force Base, Orlando, Florida
Winter Park, Florida
Tampa, Florida
Miami, Florida
Walt Disney World, Lake Buena Vista, Florida
U.S. Department of the Treasury, Washington, D.C.
New York City, New York

Temporal Coverage


Accrual Method

Donation

Mediator

History Teacher
Civics/Government Teacher
Economics Teacher
Geography Teacher

Rights Holder

Copyright to this resource is held by the Lou Frey Institute of Politics & Government and is provided here by RICHES of Central Florida for educational purposes only.

Curator

Mayer, Erica
Cepero, Laura

Digital Collection

External Reference

"Congressman Lou Frey, Jr. Biography." Lou Frey Institute of Politics & Government. http://loufreyjr.com/.
"FREY, Louis, Jr., (1934 - )." Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, United States Congress. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=F000381.
Frey, Lou, and Michael T. Hayes. Inside the House: Former Members Reveal How Congress Really Works. Lanham, MD: U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress, 2001.
Shaw, Frederick J. Locating Air Force Base Sites: History's Legacy. Washington D.C.: Air Force History and Museums Program, United States Air Force, 2004.

Transcript

Okay for McCoy Expected
Port Of Entry Status Close

Orlando Jetport at McCoy could become an international port of entry within three months if the U. S. Treasury Department gives the city’s application for a U. S. customs office quick approval as expected, Orlando City Atty. Egerton K. van den Berg said Tuesday.

U. S. Rep. Louis Frey Jr., R-Winter Park, said Tuesday in Winter Park he expects Treasury Secretary William Simon to grant approval by Sept. 1.

Van den Berg said once the Treasury Department gives the nod, a temporary facility could be opened within a month to begin processing foreign visitors.

A permanent International Arrivals Building is expected to take about six months to build, the city attorney said.

Orlando’s quest for a customs office has the blessings of district and regional customs officials in Tampa and Miami respectively. It has been sent to Washington for final approval.

Jack Gillooly, project manager for jetport development, said Tampa customs officials are so convinced the city’s application will be approved, they sent an assistant district director to meet with him Tuesday to discuss which portion of the airfield would be designed the “port of entry” section.

Orlando has been trying for 10 years to be declared a port of entry. With the opening of Walt Disney World and other attractions, the need became acute because of the volume of foreign tourists.

Foreign visitors must now fly to international airports such as Miami, Tampa or New York to clear customs. They then transfer to a domestic flight to Orlando.

With an international airport, foreign flights would come directly to Orlando.

Van den Berg said that probably only foreign charter flights would land here initially because “that’s where the demand is.”

Regularly scheduled foreign flights --which must be approved by the Civil Aeronautics Board --are “way in the distance,” after a demand for them builds, van den Berg said.

The aeronautics board does not approve charter flights.

The city and Page Airways of Florida Inc., which has the jetport fuel sales and aircraft service lease, have entered into a partnership to build the International Arrivals Building. The city would put up $350,000 with Page supplying $450,000, said John Meacham, Orlando aviation director.

MEACHAM said no decision has been made whether the word international would be added to the jetport’s name once the port of entry status is achieved.
Van den Berg said the city will apply for its share of the arrivals building under the amended Airport and Airways Development Act signed Tuesday by President Ford.

(Continued On Page 5-A, Col. 1)

Document Item Type Metadata

Original Format

1 newspaper article

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