Oral History of Luticia "Tish" Lee, Linda Maliczowski, and Catherine "Cathy" Dingle

Dublin Core

Title

Oral History of Luticia "Tish" Lee, Linda Maliczowski, and Catherine "Cathy" Dingle

Alternative Title

Oral History, Lee, Maliczowski, and Dingle

Subject

Sanford (Fla.)
Oral history--United States
Rolling pins
Baking--United States
World War II--United States
Secretaries--Biography
American Legion
Heirlooms--United States

Description

Oral history of Luticia "Tish" Lee and her two daughters, Linda Maliczowski and Cathy Dingle. The interview was conducted by University of Central Florida Professor of History Dr. Scot French on October 20, 2013.

Lee was born in Sanford, Florida in 1923 and lived in her family house, which was constructed in 1926, while growing up. Her father was a member of the American Legion and worked as a superintendent for the Crown Paper Company, and also as a carpenter. Following her high school graduation, Lee worked as a secretary for the local ice plant, which no longer stands. Other topics in the oral history include Sanford during World War II, the cannon at the American Legion Hall, the Lee family rolling pin and other family heirlooms, baking various foods, Lee's father, the grocery store run by Lee's mother and aunt, Lee's involvement with Creative Sanford, Inc. productions, a family fireless cooker, and the French house.

Abstract

Oral history interview of Luticia Lee, Linda Maliczowski, and Cathy Dingle. Interview conducted by Scot French at the Lee home in Sanford, Florida.
An oral history interview conducted by Dr. Scot French. The interviewees were Luticia “Tish” Lee and her two daughters, Linda Maliczowski and Cathy Dingle. We discuss the Second World War, life in Sanford during this time, the rolling pin and its origins and significance, and several other important topics.

Table Of Contents

0:00:00 Introduction
0:00:30 Lee's biographical information
0:01:59 Cedar chest and rolling pin
0:03:23 Reflections on life
0:04:26 Sanford during World War II
0:06:25 Scrap metal drive and the American Legion cannon
0:08:46 History of family rolling pin
0:10:56 Lee's father
0:12:40 History of the American Legion cannon
0:13:39 Memories of the home front and the end of WWII
0:15:37 Sailors and the Naval Air Station (NAS) Sanford
0:16:58 How Sanford change after the war
0:18:12 Family heirlooms
0:18:33 Lee's grandfather and his hospital
0:18:58 Uncle James' grocery store
0:21:02 How Lee got involved with Creative Sanford
0:23:19 Lee's daughters, Linda Maliczowski and Cathy Dingle
0:25:10 Cooking and its connection to family memories
0:26:11 Closing remarks
0:26:55 RECORDING CUTS OFF
0:26:55 History of the fireless cooker
0:30:30 The French house

Creator

French, Scot
Lee, Luticia
Maliczowski, Linda
Dingle, Cathy

Source

Lee, Luticia, Linda Maliczowski, and Cathy Dingle. Interviewed by Scot French. October 30, 2013. Audio/video record available. RICHES of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.

Date Created

2013-10-30

Date Copyrighted

2013-10-30

Date Modified

2014-01-06

Contributor

Orleman, Andrew
Snow, Paul

Has Format

Digital transcript of original 32-minute and 17-second oral history: Lee, Luticia, Linda Maliczowski, and Cathy Dingle. Interviewed by Scot French. October 30, 2013. Audio/video record available. RICHES of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida.

Is Part Of

Celery Soup: Florida’s Folk Life Play Collection, Sanford Collection, Seminole County Collection, RICHES of Central Florida.

Requires

Multimedia software, such as Adobe Flash Player.
Application software, such as Java.

Format

video/mp4
application/pdf

Extent

211 MB
222 KB

Medium

32-minute and 17-second audio/video recording
23-page digital transcript

Language

eng

Type

Moving Image

Coverage

Creative Sanford, lnc., Sanford, Florida
Celery Soup, Sanford, Florida
American Legion Campbell-Lossing Post 53, Sanford, Florida
Naval Air Station (NAS), Sanford, Florida
Lee Grocery Store, Sanford, Florida
French House, Sanford, Florida

Accrual Method

Item Creation

Mediator

History Teacher
Geography Teacher

Provenance

Originally created by Scot French, Luticia Lee, Linda Maliczowski, and Cathy Dingle, and published by RICHES of Central Florida.

Contributing Project

Dr. Scot French's "Tools in Digital History Seminar," Fall 2013 at the University of Central Florida

Curator

Snow, Paul
Orleman, Andrew

Digital Collection

Source Repository

External Reference

Sanford Historical Society (Fla.). Sanford. Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2003.
"American Legion Campbell-Lossing Post 53." American Legion Campbell-Lossing Post 53. http://www.americanlegionpost53florida.com/.
"History." The American Legion. http://www.legion.org/history.
American Legion. The American Legion. Indianapolis, Ind: American Legion, 1981.
"WHO IS CREATIVE SANFORD, INC?" Celery Soup. http://www.celerysoupsanford.com//about.
"About: History and Purpose." Celery Soup. http://www.celerysoupsanford.com/about/.
"Sanford, Florida: How do you make Celery Soup? Add stories, then stir." Community Performance International. http://www.communityperformanceinternational.org/sanford-florida.

Transcript

French
So to—to—what we usually do with the beginning of the interviews is introduce ourselves and I’m Scot [French]. This is October 30th, 2013. And, um, we are interviewing, uh, Luticia Lee. Do you go by “Tish?” “Tisch?”

Lee 
Tish.

French
Tish?

Lee
Tish.

French
How do you spell that? “T-I-C-H” or “S-H”?

Lee
S-H.

Maliczowski
T-I-S-H.

French
You know, on some of the things we had from Creative Sanford[, Inc]. It had “C,” and so I’m glad we asked.

Dingle
Yes[?].

French
Um, and so the first—let[sic] me do is to ask you: would you intro—you mind introducing yourself to us?

All
[laugh]

Lee
Well…

Maliczowski
Just tell ‘em your name.

Dingle
 
Tell ‘em your name.

Lee
My name is Luticia Lee, and I was born in Sanford in, um, 1923. And my house was built in 1926. And at—growing up, I could walk everywhere. I could walk to school. And um, at that time, there were just three houses on the block. And then in, um—I’m not sure when—but the Spencer house that was on the corner, it burned. It was the old house and it burned. So, until ’46, there was just this house and the one my aunt and uncle built. And then in ‘46, Braley[?] Oaklem[?] built more houses. And um, so things really did change you know. You—you didn’t have that many people here [laughs]. And, uh, you knew everybody. And now, I go to town and I don’t know anybody.

All 
[laugh]

Lee
It’s changed so, but, um—and, I do have friends that I went to school with. And we try to go out once a week for dinner and we graduated together in ‘42 [laughs].

And that’s when, um, my dad—Mom and Daddy gave me my cedar chest. And that’s when, um, Mama crocheted me a bedspread, which I still have. And Daddy wanted to make something, and that’s when—it was the beginning of the [World] War [II]. And they asked for scrap metal and that’s when they took—were taking out—down their cannon. And Daddy had—was in the military and he helped take it down. And he got the, um, spoke from the wheel, and made my rolling pin, which is the only rolling pin I have used all these years. And I’m giving it to Cathy [Dingle],[1] ‘cause she cooks, and she bakes cookies, and she rolls ‘em.

All
[laugh]

Dingle
She[2] cooks as well, but I bake [laughs].

Maliczowski
I get the, um…

Dingle
Fireless…

Maliczowski
Fireless cooker.

All
[laugh]

Maliczowski 
I’m gonna do the crock pot thing.

All 
[laugh]

French 
Oh great. Great.

Lee
So she gets the—and um…

But I’ve had a wonderful life. I really have. Been right here. Still have friends that I’ve had all my life. I’ve lost a lot, but when you reach 90, you, um—you—it happens, you know? So—and if I get sad, I just sit down and count my blessings, ‘cause I’ve got a lot of them.

I have three children, I have four grandchildren, I have four great-grandchildren, and I have wonderful in-laws. Everybody is good to me. And my husband took care of me. He’s been gone 10 years, but I have somebody do the yard, I have a landscaper, I have, um, a cleaning service to do the house. So I just sit around and watch people work.

All
[laugh]

Lee
I don’t work anymore [laughs].

French
Well we’re—we’re putting you to work today, because you are our resident historian.

All
[laugh]

French 
And we’re—we’d love to hear a little bit more about Sanford during World War II. Uh, you graduated from high school in ’42?

Lee
Yeah.

French 
And what are your memories of that period—of being in Sanford during the war?

Lee
Well, now, I was working during the war. Um, I was a secretary at the ice plant. And um, and we, um—we iced the cars. That, you know—I didn’t do it.

Unidentified
[laughs]

Lee
The people did. And, um, I kept the records. And, uh, they took all the stuff to troops and everything.

French
These are railroad cars or— or shipping cars? What kind of cars were they?

Lee
They were railroad cars. Railroad cars. It was the—on the tracks out on [Florida State Road] 46. And I think they still—they don’t—I don’t know if the ice plant’s still there.

Dingle 
No.

Maliczowski
It was for years, but, uh, I don’t think it is anymore.

Lee
And, um…

French
And you were a secretary at the…

Lee
Mmhmm.

French
Ice plant?

Lee
For a few years. It didn’t really take.

All 
[laugh]

Lee
I just did what I was told. And I—but, um, and it—it’s Sanford during the war. We—we had the base[3] out here. And, uh, sometimes we dated the pilots, which was a lot of fun.

All 
[laugh]

Lee 
But, um, I don’t know.

French
Did you, um—were—were there local rallies or efforts to sort of rally the town’s people? Uh, you mentioned that they decided to melt the cannon, because of the scrap metal drive. Do you remember much about the scrap metal drives, and other things?

Lee
Honey, I got—I—I researched that, and there’s the papers over there.

French
Oh.

Lee
And it—yeah. I wanted to know.

French
And so are these, uh—okay. So these are some of the materials that you—you did all the research on this, you…

Lee
Yes. I did.

French
You went down to the museum?

Lee
Yeah.

French
And um…

Lee
And see? It says, “County League [inaudible] scrap collection on per capita basis.” And, um, I—it was very interesting. It really was. And, and, uh “Legion pole?” Oh, I can’t read…

French
“Legion post will give up cannon in scrap drive.” This is perfect. This is exactly what we were hoping…

Lee
Yeah.

French
To find. You’ve done the work for us. [laughs]

All
[laugh]

Lee
Well…

French
Thank you.

Lee
I wanted to know what was, you know—and this was the Legion Hut.[4]

Maliczowski
And she had pictures made, and—and a frame made, and took the picture out to the Legion.

Lee
And see…

French
Oh, wonderful.

Maliczowski
So they would know.

Lee
And that’s what…

French
Is this also from the museum?

Lee
Hm?

French
Is this from the museum? Or is this a….

Lee
Well, um…

French 
This photograph…

Lee
Uh, they took a picture. You see, they didn’t have a picture out at the new Legion Hut. And, um, I thought they should have one. So I went and—and got a picture. And—of the canon, and, um, now—but I couldn’t ever find out who that man was.

French 
Mmhmm.

Lee 
I guess the ones that were there then were all gone. So I don’t know who he was. But anyway, I had that, um, copied and I framed it and I took it out and I gave it to them, so they’d have a picture of the old Legion Hut.

French
That is wonderful.

Lee
And they put it up.

French
That is wonderful.

Lee
So, anyway…

French
This is great. And this—you—these pictures are from the museum? Is that where you found these?

Lee
Yes. I found them…

French
Great.

Lee
From the paper.

French 
Great. Wow. And this is, uh, a handwritten note?

Lee
I had that and I can’t read it now [laughs].

French 
Do you rem—what of the—you wrote this for yourself? Or…

Lee 
Yes. For me.

French 
And what was the—what was the event that led you to write that?

Lee 
Well, uh, I think there was something in, um—in the paper about, um…

French
Do you want me to read it?

Dingle
Want me to go look, Mama?

Lee
You can read it maybe. It’s about when Daddy decided to make, um…

Dingle
Oh, oh this is when, um—deciding which precious keepsake you wanted…

Lee
Oh.

Dingle
To write about from your cedar chest.

Lee
Oh.

Dingle
And, um, how Granddaddy wanted you to have something that was from him. And how he went about getting the—the spoke and…

Lee
Yeah.

Dingle
Making the…

Lee
Making my…

Maliczowski
Your rolling pin.

Dingle
Your rolling pin to go in your hope chest. That’s why you wrote that up.

French
And this was from the paper?

Lee
I wrote it up to put in the cedar chest.

French 
Oh, to put in the cedar chest. So did you write this?

Dingle 
So that people would know what, you know—so that we would know where it came from. We would—we would have a history of why she had it and where it came from.

French 
Mmhmm.

Lee
Because, um, I wanted them to know. See, Mama crocheted the bedspread and Daddy wanted to put something in it.

Dingle 
Mmhmm.

Lee 
So I wrote it…

Maliczowski 
Wrote it down for us.

French 
So, this is the rolling pin. Do you mind if I…

Lee 
Sure.

Maliczowski
Go ahead.

Lee   
I just wrap it up. I haven’t used it for a while. But she’s going to use it to make Christmas cookies.

Dingle
Yes. I will.

Lee
You can tell it’s been used.

All
[laugh]

Dingle
Lots of biscuits.

Maliczowski
A lot. Yeah. Biscuit—biscuit [inaudible] and pies.

Dingle
Biscuits and pies are mainly what it did.

French 
Mmhmm…

Lee
Mainly it was Daddy’s biscuits.

Dingle
That’s right.

French
So when I read the story about this, we got to talking and—and, uh, thought about Well, what made him think to make a rolling pin out of a spoke? Because he worked at a paper factory, correct?

All 
Yes.

French 
So he would have been familiar with all the equipment that you could do this with, uh, milling? It’s called “milling?”

Lee
Yeah, but he was superintendent of the Crown Paper Company. That’s when they—they printed they, uh, wrappers. That’s when they wrapped fruit. It was individually wrapped for a long time. They don’t do that anymore. They just pack it in boxes and ship it off. But, um, Daddy was there so—and he was in the [American] Legion, and when they went to send the cannon back, he went to help them dismantle it, and that’s when he got the spoke, and, um, that’s what he could do. He could make me a rolling pin, and that was in ‘42.

Maliczowski
Because everybody needed a rolling pin.

All 
[laugh]

Dingle
He was also a carpenter, so he had worked with wood in building this house. And if—if you look on the floor, you’ll see there’s designs in the wood. And…

Lee
And there’s my—my, uh, [inaudible]…

Dingle
Back in the corner. So he was…

Lee
That Daddy had built for me, when I was—yeah.

French
Oh.

Lee
When I was four or five.

Dingle
So he was always thinking of things to do with wood and something else to make and something to do, so I think that just came naturally to…

French
Mmhmm.

Dingle
To do that.

Lee
To do the rolling pin.

Dingle
Something for her.

Lee
It would go in a cedar chest.

All 
[laugh]

Dingle
It would fit.

Maliczowski 
It would fit.

French
So, do you know the story of the cannon? What was the history of this cannon? Was this someth—it was brought back from World War I?

Lee
Well, yeah. When they built the Legion Hut. Um, I don’t know where they got the cannon. But, um, they wanted a cannon from the First World War. So, I don’t know where they got it. Now they got a cannon out at the other—the other Legion Hut. And I don’t know where they got it. I think they just feel that, you know, it’s history. They had cannons.

Unidentified
Mmhmm.

Lee 
It’s an old one. It’s got wooden spokes I think. I haven’t gotten out of the car to examine it, but I’ve driven by.

French
Uh, so, um, what other—do you have other memories of the home front during the war or the end of the war? There’s[sic] certain moments of that period…

Lee
Oh, I remember end of the war. Oh, there was a parade down on First Street, and I remember being [laughs] in the car. And we was[sic] driving, and my cousins were with me, and everybody was screaming and hollering. And Mama remembered the end of the First World War. And how, um, things were downtown then.

Maliczowski
Now during this time, didn’t Grandma and Aunt Marty still—didn’t they run the grocery store at that time, during the war? Were they running it? [inaudible].

Lee
They came in 1910.

Maliczowski
No, but did they still have the store in the ‘40s?

Lee  Yes.

Maliczowski
Okay. Well, tell them about them having the store and one of the reasons—like, during the war they didn’t have this much[sic] problem with food, because they had a grocery store?

Lee
Yeah, but they also had rationing, you know.

Maliczowski
Mmhmm.

Lee
They rationed, uh, meat. They rationed sugar, and, um—and I do remember that.

Maliczowski
They rationed shoes. And tell them what happened with you. She has very tiny feet.

Lee
Oh, yeah. Shoes were rationed. Isn’t that funny? They rationed shoes [laughs]. Oh dear.

Maliczowski
But she had such a hard time finding shoes that everybody—whenever she would find it they would give her their shoe coup—what were they, uh…

Lee
Shoe coupon.

Maliczowski
Shoe coupon, so that she could buy the shoes, because she would—she loved shoes.

All
[laugh]

Lee
Yeah.

Dingle
It was hard for her to find them in her size so if they found a pair that would fit her they…

Maliczowski
They would have to use somebody else’s coupon to buy her a pair of shoes.

French
That’s great. That’s great. Did you know soldiers who had—from Sanford—young men of your age?

Lee
Yes.Yeah. I remember one of the boys in my class, who was killed. He was Fred Dyson[sp]. I remember that. I don’t remember. I don’t remember a lot of them going to war.

French
And the base being nearby—what was—you mentioned the pilots, uh…

Lee
Yeah.

French
Was there—was[sic] there other kinds of connections to the base, besides the kind of social connections?

Lee  
Well, um, several of my friends worked out there. And, um, I know Margie married, er, one of the pilots. And, um, a lot of them, you know—I met some of them through friends that worked there. But, um, we didn’t—I mean, they weren’t there that long, you know. You just see ‘em and I know one time we went to New Smyrna [Beach] with a group, uh, a whole—I mean, it was usually in a group. So…

French
You mentioned that after the war, how much Sanford changed. You mentioned I think one of—all the building…

Lee
Oh, yeah.

French
Construction in this area.

Lee
Construction started. Houses were built.

French
And so this little town you grew up in became—started to grow and grow [laughs].

Lee
Yeah. And it’s still growing.

All
[laugh]

Maliczowski
Sanford was lucky, because it was both on the river and it had the railroad.

Lee
Yes.

Maliczowski
So that’s one of the reasons it was able to flourish like it did. And, um, there’s a big hotel downtown—well, now it’s not the hotel anymore, it’s, um, is the New Tribe’s Mission headquarters—world headquarters. It used to be the Mayfair Hotel. And people would come and stay for the winter, and that sort of thing. So it—ya know, it drew a lot of people and brought them here to spend their money in Sanford while they were getting away from the cold.

French
So, um, you stayed. People have come and people have gone. And you’ve been here, uh, and—why did you stay?

Lee
This is my home and I want to stay right here.

French 
Uh, you’re surrounded by, uh, a lot of the artifacts of your life. All the great, um…

Lee
Yeah.

French 
Pieces of furniture and art and…

Lee
Yeah. Uh huh. And Aunt Marty’s pitcher and bowl when she came in 1910. My grandfather was a doctor in Mount Olive, North Carolina. And when he died, um—he had made a—he bought a small hotel, and he made into a—that’s where he could take patients, and it was like a small hospital. And Aunt Marty worked for him.

But then he died and, um, uh, Uncle [James] came down and he was—he’s the one that started the grocery store, and his friend from here was up there. and he told my Uncle James he would sell him half of the grocery store, and give his son the other half, and—if he would come down. So they all decided to come in 1910.

Now Mama, and Aunt Ruth, and Grandma stayed up there ‘til they got the house built on Laurel Avenue. It burned down later. And, um, that’s when they came and Mama went to grammar school to the high school. And then they built the new—what was—we went to junior high. And it was the high school, and that’s where Mama graduated in 1913. And so Uncle James had started the grocery store—I mean, he was half-owner. But then his son didn’t like it, and he sold his half [laughs]. So it was [inaudible] and it was all during the war.

French
And do you have memories of the store?

Lee
Huh?

French
Do you have memories or picture of the store? Do you have any photographs of the store?

Lee
Ya know, it—it’s down—the building is still there, and it’s where The [Sanford] Herald is, right on the corner of Palmetto [Avenue] and First Street. And back then, the city didn’t decorate like they do[sic] now. And every, um, owner of the store would. And I remember Daddy putting— tying the Christmas tree to the lamp post [laughs] and—and decorating it for Aunt Marty. So, because Uncle James died recently, Aunt Marty ran the grocery store, so…

French
Well, some of these stories—well, the one story that—that the Creative San—well, first I wanted to ask you a little bit about how you, um, came to be interviewed for the Creative Sanford play? Do you know the…

Maliczowski
Well, I have a friend who was involved in Creative Sanford during both of the productions they’ve made so far, and I went to school with her sister, and so she knew me, and she knew Mama, and she knew that she must have some kind of story that she can tell. And so she said, “We need to interview Luticia.”

Lee
They came and interviewed me.

Maliczowski
And yeah. So they came and started talking to her and that was the…

Lee 
[inaudible]

Maliczowski
Particular story that they decided to go with.

French
So they didn’t know when they came about the rolling pin. They just…

Maliczowski
No. They just knew that she had things.

All
[laugh]

Maliczowski
And stories and that she had been here her whole life. That she—that she was born here and grew up here. And that’s why they wanted to know her view of—I mean, they asked her lots of questions about lots of things, and this was one of the things they felt that they could incorporate into the play.

French
Were you surprised that they chose to tell that story?

Lee
Yes. I was. [laughs] And it was just real neat. And they did it really good[sic].

Unidentified
Yes.

Lee
And—and they—they told ‘em how Daddy did the rolling pin, you know. So we were given front row seats.

Maliczowski 
Yeah. In the original, uh—the first play[5] one of mom’s best friends had a story in it. So they—they got so many stories that they couldn’t put them all in the first play. So they put ‘em in—they made a second play.[6] And they’re going to have a third one,[7] I think.

Lee
Yeah.

French
They said they were doing—still doing interviews for…

Lee
I think they’re doing something now.

Maliczowski
Yeah. They—they’re getting ready to.

French
And, um, so the other—I had a third [inaudible] just one other [inaudible] that I forgot in my notes here. Um, um, well, let me ask my—my colleagues here. Other questions that you would like to ask?

No? So we, uh, are also interested in this as a family story. So I’ll just step off the couch here for a minute and just have—if I could ask the two of you to join your mom. And we’ll just talk about it as a—this is a family. Oh, wow.

Dingle
Just if you wanted to see some…

French
Fantastic.

Maliczowski
Here, Cath. you sit in the middle and you get to hold the rolling pin.

Dingle
It’s my rolling pin.

French
So if you wouldn’t mind introducing yourselves.

Maliczowski
I’m Linda Maliczowski. I’m the middle child [laughs].

Dingle
I’m Cathy Dingle. I’m the oldest. Our brother’s not here. He’s the baby.

French
And so you, um, were you part of the—the original interview. I know if you were, because you had the connection to your friend.

Maliczowski
Right. And I live here.

French 
And you live here.

Maliczowski
In Sanford.

French
And so, um, for you, um, this is a—a family heirloom. And, um, as you told the story, it—you—your memory of this is not just in a hope chest, but, as, uh something your mom used and…

Maliczowski
Oh yeah. Yeah. I mean we grew up with her doing that and eventually she told us all about it. But I mean, when someone would say, “Go get the rolling pin,” you knew what to get [laughs] and that was it. We had one rolling pin.

Dingle
And I really remember mostly biscuits. And pies.

Maliczowski
Biscuits and pies, because I learned how to do pies.

Dingle
Yes. And I learned to make a lot of biscuits with it so…

French
So for you, the memories attached to it are family memories? Not, not World War II, American Legion, home front, sacrifice.

Dingle
No. It’s Mama baking with it. Using it.

Maliczowski
She also made donuts.

Dingle 
Donuts. That’s right.

Maliczowski
We had to roll them out and cut them with the little donut thing.

Dingle
Cut them and fry them. Yes.

French
Well, one of the things that that makes me think about is that people cooked like that all the time, and now it’s more rare[sic]. And you have a choice, whether you want to do that. It’s not part of our everyday lives to have a rolling pin but you still, uh—I’m sorry, but who’s getting the rolling pin?

Maliczowski 
Cathy.

Dingle
Yeah.

French
You still cook and you…

Maliczowski
Oh, yes.

French
So does that make you feel connected in some way through the, you know—through the [inaudible]?

Dingle
Yes, because, you know, I remember Mama using it and I remember it, you know, in this house. And I remember it in our other house, and my granddaughters will help me use it. So, in fact, one asked me last week, she says, “Are we going to get to make Christmas cookies and use a rolling pin?” I said, “Yes. We are.”

All
[laugh]

Dingle
So they’re—they’re used to that.

French
And, um, do you—do you also have things like recipes and cookbooks, and things like that, that are…

Dingle
Oh, yes.

French
We have a student in our class who’s studying cookbooks. It’s actually a historical subject and an interesting one.

Dingle
Oh [laughs].

Maliczowski 
There’s so many.

Dingle
Oh, so many. Yes.

French
So, uh, one of the things we’ve been thinking about in our class is the connection between personal stories and personal history. And then there’s the community history— Sanford. And then there’s national and world history. And I think that’s what’s unique about this object is that it connects all of them, you know?

Maliczowski
Yeah. Mmhmm.

French
So we really thank you so much for sharing that story with us, and sharing your time with us. The only—the other thing is if, if it would be okay with you for us to take still photographs of some of these objects, uh, for inclusion in the exhibit.

Maliczowski 
Sure.

French
That would be wonderful. Thank you.

Dingle
No problem.

French
Do you—do you want anything else that we should talk about on the—the…

Orleman
No. the recording—I think we’re…

Dingle
We’re good?

Orleman
Yeah.

French
Okay. Very good. Thank you so…

One quick question, because we were talking about this before was the, um…

Maliczowski
Fireless cooker.

Dingle
Fireless cooker.

French
Fireless cooker, which is over there. But could you just tell us the story of the fireless…

Lee
My—my son, um—he, um, went online [clears throat] to find out more about it [clears throat]. And he said that in one of the—years ago, presidents had one in his[sic] house, but I don’t remember.

Dingle
But they—tell him where this one came from.

Lee
This one came from, um, Miss Bessie.

Dingle 
Yup

Lee
And it—well, I already told you.

Maliczowski
Yeah, but they want to video it. They want to…

All 
[laugh]

Lee
[laughs] I’m at it again. [clears throat] Well, in 1910, when my aunt came down, when she roomed in Miss Bessy’ house[?]. Her mother—[clears throat] excuse me. Her mother had a boarding house, and she did not cook on a Sunday, so she had the fireless cooker—that one. And, um, she would put the—the—it’s all there. Every piece. And the stones that had the thing to hook and put them in her fire. She had a wood stove. When they got hot, she’d put them in the fireless cooker. And then she would get her food hot on—in the pans, put them in, and close it up, and it would cook all night. And when she came home from church on Sunday, she’d open it up and she could serve it, but she didn’t have to cook. So that’s what—and my husband was fascinated with it. I said, “What do we do with it?” He says[sic], “I don’t care what we do with it. It’s a chest.” So it’s been in the living room in the old house. I told you we were in the French house years ago.

French
Yes.

Lee
And that’s where we raised the kids. And Mama was—was still here and my aunts. And, um, [clears throat] so, um—where was I?

Dingle
You had it in the old house and then you brought it here.

Lee
Yeah. I had it in the living room over there, and then I brought it here. So the fireless cooker’s always been in the living room. It’s been a piece to show people.

Dingle
But we never used it.

Lee  
No. never used it.

Maliczowski
I plan on using it someday. Tell them about, um, how they used to use them during the war.

Lee
Oh, well, yeah. When Jimmy [Lee] researched it, he said they were used during the First World War—fireless cookers—mainly in tanks, so they could put the food in the cooker, and then they could go where they were going. And they would have the food.

Maliczowski
Mmhmm.

Lee
So, uh…

Maliczowski
We don’t know where they got this one, but we’re glad they did.

All
[laugh]

Maliczowski
So…

Lee
So, but that’s—and they had—had—in fact, I used to get the [inaudible] magazine. And somebody had put theirs in, only it was just a one, but they made one, and they made two, and ours is a three.

French
Great.

Lee 
Three—whatever.

Dingle
Three pans [laughs].

Maliczowski
Three pots.

Dingle
Three pots.

Lee
Yes.Three pots

French
And you mentioned the French house. Where—what was the address of the French house?

Dingle
113 West Fifteenth Street.

French
Is it still there?

Dingle
It is. If you go up Oak Avenue—if you’re going up Oak, then you have to go around…

Maliczowski 
You would run into the house.

Dingle
You would run into the house if you went straight up, but—yeah.

Maliczowski
My husband and I bought the house from Mom and Dad. And we lived there for quite a few years. We sold it when my son was about 13.

French 
Oh, okay.

Maliczowski
And, it…

Lee
Just a minute.

Maliczowski
Yeah. Do you have the thing from when we sold it?

French  
So this is one of the—the—the same French as French Ave[nue] and…

Maliczowski
Yeah. French Avenue was his brother.

French 
Oh, okay.

Maliczowski
There was an A. J., um, Seth and A.J. French. And, um, the man who owned our house was the mayor. I think he was the second mayor.

Dingle 
I think so.

Maliczowski
Mom might remember, but he was one of the first mayors of Sanford.

French
Oh, okay. Great. But this was the house that was built by…

Maliczowski
Right. And my grandmother was living here.

French
I see.

Maliczowski
And then when Mom and Dad—when they first got married, we lived over in Orlando and we moved over here when were seven and eight years old. And they found—that house was available so they bought that house. And we were there—the whole family—from when they bought it and then when I sold it, we were there for over 50 years.

French
Great. Wow. So, uh, this is great. I think, Andrew [Orleman], we can, uh—we’ll wrap up the…

Maliczowski
Oh, she’s got the, um—yeah. This isn’t what I was thinking but this is—it was on the Sanford our of home so…

French
Oh, okay. I went two years ago. I didn’t—okay.

Lee
That’s what it looks like now.

French
Okay.

Lee
But it looked like that [inaudible].

Maliczowski
Well Mom and Dad, when we were growing up it was [inaudible]…


[1] Lee’s daughter.

[2] Linda Maliczowski, Lee’s daughter and Dingle’s sister.

[3] Naval Air Station (NAS) Sanford.

[4] American Legion Campbell-Lossing Post 53.

[5] Touch and Go.

[6] Made – Not Bought.

[7] Remade – Not Bought.

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

French, Scot

Interviewee

Lee, Latisha
Mallaskaski, Linda
Bingle, Cathy

Location

Sanford, Florida

Original Format

1 audio/video recording

Duration

32 minutes and 17 seconds

Bit Rate/Frequency

912kbps

Locations

Categories