Oral History of Leonard Casselberry and Jane Casselberry

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Title

Oral History of Leonard Casselberry and Jane Casselberry

Alternative Title

Oral History, Casselberry

Subject

Casselberry (Fla.)
Winter Park (Fla.)
Ferns--Florida
Azaleas--United States

Description

An oral history of Leonard and Jane Casselberry, conducted by Daniel Motta on May 30, 2012. In the interview, the Casselberrys discuss life in Casselberry, Florida, which was founded by Leonard's father, Hibbard Casselberry. Other topics discussed include the founding of Casselberry, working in the fern industry, the effect of World War II on the home front, how Leonard and Jane met, how Casselberry has changed over time, Hibbard Casselberry's involvement in growing azaleas and oak trees, and the Casselberrys' occupations after Leonard left the U.S. Navy.

Abstract

Oral history interview of Leonard Casselberry and Jane Casselberry. Interview conducted by Daniel Motta at the Museum of Seminole County History in Sanford, Florida.

Table Of Contents

0:00:00 Introduction
0:00:38 Education and childhood
0:02:00 Founding of Casselberry
0:04:28 How Leonard and Jane met
0:04:37 Working with ferns
0:13:04 Shipping ferns
0:15:59 Fern industry during the war
0:18:41 Leonard's father
0:19:48 How the city has progressed over time
0:21:50 Leonard's father and azaleas
0:24:08 Orange groves, oak trees, and local competition
0:26:20 After leaving the Navy
0:36:20 Opinion of Casselberry today
0:37:29 Leonard's occupations
0:38:53 Closing remarks

Creator

Motta, Daniel

Source

Original 39-minute and 14-second oral history: Casselberry, Leonard and Jane Casselberry. Interviewed by Daniel Motta. UCF Community Veterans History Project. May 30, 2012. Audio record available. Museum of Seminole County History, Sanford, Florida.

Date Created

2012-05-30

Date Copyrighted

2012-05-30

Date Modified

2014-09-30

Contributor

Casselberry, Leonard
Casselberry, Jane
Vickers, Savannah

Is Part Of

Casselberry Collection, Seminole County Collection, RICHES of Central Florida.

Requires

Multimedia software, such as QuickTime.

Format

video/wav
application/pdf

Extent

396 MB
172 KB

Medium

39-minute and 14-second audio recording
19-page typed transcript

Language

eng

Type

Moving Image

Accrual Method

Donation

Mediator

History Teacher
Economics Teacher
Geography Teacher

Provenance

Originally created by Daniel Motta, Leonard Casselberry, and Janes Casselberry, and transcribed by Savannah Vickers.

Rights Holder

Copyright to this resource is held by the Museum of Seminole County History and is provided here by RICHES of Central Florida for educational purposes only.

Curator

Cepero, Laura

Digital Collection

External Reference

"History." City of Casselberry. http://www.casselberry.org/.
Robison, Jim. "Casselberry Family Sheds New Light On Life Of City Founder." The Orlando Sentinel, May 25, 2003. http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2003-05-25/news/0305230547_1_casselberry-fern-hibbard.

Transcript

Motta
All right. It is May 30, 2012, and I am speaking to Mr. Leonard Casselberry and Mrs. Jane Casselberry at the Museum of Seminole County History. To start off, Mr. Casselberry, can you tell me a little about where you were born and your childhood?

Leonard
Well, I was born in Chicago[, Illinois]. I fit in a shoebox when I came down here, and I grew up and went to school in Winter Park.

Motta
So you just moved down here when you were one or two?

Leonard
Yes, yes.

Motta
So you went through high school in Winter Park High School?

Leonard
I went to military school two years.

Jane
Bolles

Leonard
Bolles Military School in Jacksonville.

Motta
Jacksonville.

Leonard
And went in the Navy.

Motta
So did you not spend much of your childhood in the Central Florida area, or…

Leonard
Oh, yes. Yes, went to school in Winter Park, and back out in Casselberry, when I was working out there, following my dad around a little bit. It’s what you usually do [laughs].

Motta
So how long did you stay? You went through high school here, or just—when did you go to military school?

Leonard
Junior, senior year.

Motta
Okay. Was there any particular reason you went there, or...

Leonard
Well, it was just coming up on the war [World War II], and dad sent us for a little military training or something.

Motta
So how old were you when the war broke out?

Leonard
Eighteen or something.

Jane
Seventeen, I think.

Leonard
Seventeen.

Motta
Seventeen? So you didn’t serve? You were a little too young then?

Leonard
Couldn’t get in, then.

Motta
Yeah. No, no problem there.

Leonard
[laughs].

Motta
So do you have any memories of—I mean, how was it, being the son of somebody who was starting his own town?

Leonard
Of course, we—Dad[1] was in the fern business out here, and occasionally I could ride from Winter Park, where I went to school at. We lived on Lake Maitland in Winter Park, and I’d ride with Dad coming out here. From Via Tuscany, and then come out on…

Jane
Lake Howell Road.

Leonard
Lake Howell Road, and turn left and come back out this way.

Motta
I imagine that trip was different then, much different-looking.

Leonard
Yes, came by the turkey farm, and came on out through the orange groves, on out to Casselberry.

Jane
It wasn’t Casselberry in charter until 1940. His dad came in 1926, to work with—what’d they call it, Fern Park Estates? Where they would try to have like an artist colony, and people to come down, and they would have a little piece of fernery, and some orange, piece of orange groves. Maybe they’d have a little income with their house, and they could retire here or come in the winter, and…

Motta
And that was with Mr. Burnett?

Jane
Yes, he was hired to sell real estate, and to—and Mr. Burnett had a fernery, and Mr. Casselberry started his own fernery, and of course there was a lot of tension between the two.

Motta
Yeah, I’d imagine. Yeah.

Jane
Yeah.

Motta
And you went to Winter Park High School, correct—s well?

Jane
I did. I graduated from Winter Park High.

Motta
And that’s where you two met?

Jane
Yes.

Motta
So did either of you do any work with the ferns or azaleas or anything? Like, were you actually…

Jane
He did as a kid, in the winter, when they called everybody in due to the danger of freezing.

Motta
Any stories there?

Leonard
Well, you know, are you familiar with a fern shed, and you see the pots and so on? But what’s the temperature on there? And the temperature indicates it’s going to be down close to freezing. We’d call the hands in, so to speak, and watch the temperature, and then Dad had thermometers stuck in the different areas around the fernery, so we could check the different areas, and when the temperature goes down in one part of it, they notify, send somebody out to get the hands, ‘cause most of them didn’t live in Casselberry. They lived over in Altamonte [Springs], and they’d send the truck around, get the fellows to come in that were gonna be there, and one of the ladies would come in, do a little cooking for us. We’d watch, read the thermometers, and when the temperature goes down close to 30-something, we’d pass the word along. The men would come on in, and they’d get their—some of them would have—Dad used to issue boots, and…

Jane
How did they light the smudge pots?

Leonard
They’d go around with—light the flare or a little torchlight that they could light, and they’d tip them down and spill some of the diesel and gas mixture into the pot to get it started.

Motta
Into the soil?

Leonard
In the pot. Light up, take a little while, ‘cause it was fuel oil and not gasoline. It’d explode or something. So.

Motta
So that’s how they kept the ferns warm?

Leonard
Yes—well, they’d light it. And, I was reading—Paul Bates was one of those foremen there, and he’d go in and light the north, and the west, or sometimes the east side, first. A row along the fence. Well, the heat inside slat roofs like that, keeps some of the heat underneath. But it’d let the sunlight in the daytime, but when it got cold, it’d keep some of the heat in it. When the temperature got down to 32 [degrees Fahrenheit], they’d light up the side that the breeze was blowing on, and that would go through the fernery and would still keep it above freezing, until it got lower at other parts and they’d light other pots. Sometimes they’d have to light them all—before morning, ‘cause the cold temperature here about seven o’clock or after. It was quite interesting, and we’d get around the heaters, and of course we’d have to continue reading, and if the temperature drops down, or comes back up, we’d put some of them out, or didn’t light them all. When the time comes to shut them down, they’d go by and snuff them out. Then we’d have to fuel them, and Dad got the Atlantic Coast Line Railway[sic] to put a side track on up there where Casselberry’s siding, inside where our railroad station is, and how it got started.

Got a siding there. They’d come in, drop a tanker there, and we’d pump it out of there, and some of it would be there, then we’d pump it from there, part of it, out to a tank out by one part of the fernery, and another part to another part. Then they also had another pump. It would feed the line. We had line running from the tank on out the fernery. I don’t know if it shows it in this photograph or not, of a—run about a two-inch line, and then drops down to smaller, and then we had the faucet to fill at the end of each row where the pots were going down through, like in a row, and fasten the oil hose there, close the valve, of course, and then, move to the next one and fill the next row of pots that way.

Motta
Well, there’s a lot—there’s a lot you don’t think about, that goes into that.

Leonard
Yeah, they dragged in the oil, you know, like a sprinkler line or hose line down there, and it has a valve on the hose, so you’ll stick it inside the pot and watch until it gets full, turn it off and go to the next pot, does the same thing, in a row, and then as far as they can reach, and then go over to the next one and go back down, to fill them so they’d be ready for the next day.

Jane
Well, tell him about how they’d cut the fern asparagus plumosus and how they sorted it and everything.

Leonard
Well, asparagus plumosus used to—you’d refer to it as that ferns you’d see in the front of the banquet or someplace like that.

Jane
The center of the table.

Leonard
The center of the table. Sometime you get a flake of it in your butter or something—like that, butter patty?

Jane
[laughs].

Leonard
It’s a lacy fern, and it usually lays flat. When it grows, as you call it asparagus plumosus, it comes up just like a shoot of asparagus, and comes on out and sticks way up in a room like this and finally feathers out up there like that, and turned—of course, it’s not always green. It’s yellow and gets green when—it gets dark green—when you grip it off to bring in the packinghouse, and in the packinghouse, they’ll cut them and bring them in in bunches, big bunches like this—field hands— ‘cause they’ll catch all different kinds when they’re clipping them, just trying to clip ripe ones, or good ones, so to speak, and then we they come in—and then the girls will grade them, and they’ll grade them, and some of them are long, and some of them are medium, and some will be shorts.

Motta
And get rid of the…

Leonard
The rest of them.

Motta
The rejects.

Leonard
Well, yeah. Go out, and then, they will be more or less laid flat on each other, like this, with a ball, bag of moss, like, on the end of it, with a—they’re tied together.

Jane
And it would have been in a tank of water.

Leonard
Ball of paper around it, and then they would be put in a tank to preserve them, like when you put flowers in a jar to keep them.

Motta
Were they shipped out like that?

Leonard
They would just sit down on slats in shallow tanks, like this, in rows, and then they would go in, pick them out, and go to pack them. Well, they were taken out of there, and dipped in icy water, and break up ice, put it in a tank, about so square and that deep. They’d dip them in so they’d get wet all the way through. Then they’d throw them on the rack and let them drain out, and then they’d put them in thin wood pack…

Jane
Crates.

Leonard
Crates, like food crates, like…

Motta
Like fruit crates?

Leonard
Similar to that, and they would line the box with newspapers. We used to open up newspapers, get them flat like this, and then we’d roll them and take them and sell them to Barnett or Casselberry who needs them, buys them, pays them so much a pound for them. So many cents a pound for them. The newspapers all flat, and they’d take four, five, six of them to line the box, put down the end, the side, and the side like this, and some in the bottom. They’d put a few bunches of fern in there like this, and then they’d have a chunk ice, and wrap it in newspaper, several layers, depending upon the size of the box for shipping, and you’d be put it in the middle. They’d put some more fern around it like that, close newspapers around it like that, and close the crate like that. Then you gotta—like an ice box, ice in the middle, wrapped up in paper, and the fern’s the insulation, and outside’s the insulation’s newspapers, and they’d take it to the railway express, and they’d load it on the train.

Motta              I never realized how much ice was involved with ferns.

Leonard          Yes.

Jane                And the—these ferns were shipped directly to the florist, and they could be packed to order if they wanted so many shorts or longs.

Motta
And did you ship just to around the Florida area, or nationally?

Leonard
Nationally.

Jane
All the states and Canada.

Motta
Oh, yeah?

Jane
At one time, it was the largest fern business in the world.

Motta
And that kind of tapered off after the [World] War [II]?

Jane
Well, during the war, of course, that was not a priority, to ship ferns. There were war materials. Also, a lot of the men were called to war, and didn’t have people to work.

Motta
So the women were mostly working in the…

Jane
So that’s when Mr. Casselberry was looking for something to help the war effort that would involve something that the women would be good at, and they said women can sew, you know. So that’s when they started making the bandoliers for the Army.

Leonard
And parachutes for fragmentation bombs?

Jane
That came later.

Motta
And your father—did he own the factories that made those, or...

Jane
Yes.

Leonard
Yes, he converted some of the buildings where the fertilizer mixing—where we mixed the fertilizer for a while, and we quit doing that and used that building on the railroad…

Jane
To make bandoliers.

Leonard
To make bandoliers on it.

Jane
But for the parachutes, we had to have a special building, and of course getting any priority to build anything was frankly impossible back then.

Leonard
Couldn’t build, even with the parts that you couldn’t buy building material, to build houses or anything like that, ‘cause everything was going to the war.

Jane
But he got the permission ‘cause they needed this product, and it went up in, what, how many days? A month or two months, and they said it was like a miracle building, you know. So that’s where they were making the bomb chutes to be used…

Motta
Do you…

Jane
Do you wanna tell what they—how they—why they needed them?

Leonard
Well, they needed them for fragmentation bombs. The ones they dropped bombs on, they had to fly low to drop down. But when you drop a bomb, it follows along underneath your plane. So they wanted a parachute for the backup to slow the—so the pilot could get out, you know?

Jane
Lost a lot of planes that way!

Leonard
[laughs].

Jane
So they came up with the idea of putting a parachute on the bomb so it would slow it down and let the crew get away.

Motta
I’ve always seen the parachutes on the bomb, and I never thought of that. Yeah, that’s—could I—I’d like to back up a little bit. When you two met in high school, did you know who he was? I mean, did you know, like, who his father was?

Jane
Well, we were probably in tenth grade, and we would have shared some classes, study hall.

Motta
So everybody knew who his father was and everything at that time?

Jane
Well, not really much. But he had a nice convertible—owned by his dad—that he could come to school in. [laughs]

Motta
What kind of convertible?

Jane
Ford.

Leonard
This was a Ford Club Coupe convertible, with the top down.

Motta
Oh [laughs]. That’s a nice Florida car.

Leonard
Yeah, she wanted a ride home, but she didn’t tell me that ‘til later.

Motta
[laughs] Well, looks like things worked out well.

Leonard
Yes, very well.

Jane
Yes, and he lived on one side of Lake Maitland, and I lived on the other, and he would come see me in his mother’s sailboat.

Motta
So that was in Winter Park, not Maitland, you lived in?

Jane
That was Winter Park, Lake Maitland.

Motta
Okay. So, I mean, [laughs] what do you—I’d love to get your opinion on what you think of how the city’s [Casselberry] progressed. When you look at it today, what do you think? I mean, what comes to your mind?

Leonard
Well, we remember when we were incorporated, but also remember when we didn’t have so many families there.

Jane
Back to about the paper that they wrapped the ice in, that was a good way—later, after the war, when we had children, that’s how they made their money to go to the movies or whatever. We’d take newspapers, and roll them, and sell them to the fernery.

Motta
Oh, yeah? So people would just collect newspapers and sell them?

Leonard
Yeah, you’d collect your newspapers, leftover newspapers.

Jane
Stack them up and roll them.

Leonard
Recycling, so to speak.

Motta
Do you remember how much you got for like a bundle, or—like, how much…

Jane
 
Not much, but it was a lot then.

Motta 
Yeah, few cents here and there. Yeah.

Leonard
Well, get a couple of rolls, and you made a movie ticket.

Motta
That’s not bad.

Jane
And the ferns were shipped on railway express, back then, ‘cause they didn’t have the airplanes and things, and one of the first times we ever sent a shipment out on air, we went up to Ocala, and there was just like a cargo plane, maybe like a [Douglas] DC-3.

Motta
So there wasn’t an airport near Sanford, then?

Jane
Well, I don’t know. Maybe that was the nearest one that was shipping agricultural things.

Motta
So do you remember—I read that your father got into azaleas—like starting to grow azaleas. Is that correct?

Jane
Yeah.

Leonard
Yes, back…

Jane
Earlier he was into gladiolas.

Motta
Oh, yeah.

Jane
They grew out gladiolas from the bulbs. And—I gave Kim [Nelson] a picture, and the Belgian azaleas were beautiful. Up ‘til then, you know, just had the plain azaleas. But we had—with the Belgian azaleas, there were so many different varieties, and they were ruffled, [inaudible], different colors and combination of colors, and he was in business with a man called Jules Cole…

Leonard
Jules Cole.

Jane
That knew about azaleas. That’s how they got introduced.

Motta
But it was mostly just ferns. That was the main product?

Jane
Yeah.

Leonard
The Belgian azaleas, they set up as a couple acres or something like that for him, and developed them. Dad sold them out on the highway, and would scatter them around through town.

Jane
There was an area that had, like the bay trees and oak trees and things. It was like north of where the [Casselberry] City Hall is now. It’s this plain, but back then it was just thick woods.

Motta
Near Lake Concord, or...

Jane
And he had, like…

Leonard
South of Lake Concord.

Motta
Okay.

Jane
Like a faux Cypress Gardens. He had girls in antebellum skirts and outfits, showing people around the azaleas.

Motta
Oh, yeah? Were there like refreshments and things there?

Leonard
No, it wasn’t that. But it was just a…

Motta
Just a…

Leonard
Something that slows traffic down.

Jane
[laughs].

Motta
So you mentioned going by orange groves. Your father wasn’t in that business at all? Orange…

Leonard
No, we had a couple places where we started some going. Tally Hattaway and I got a bunch of seedlings up, but we didn’t follow through with much of them.

Jane
They were, like, sour, and they had this idea of planting them in the ferneries to add a shade. I guess it was expensive to replace the slats, and they planted these trees—orange trees—that got big, to provide shade, and that was the area where you find Target now.

Motta
By the Evergreen Cemetery?

Jane
It was all ferneries, and it had those orange trees growing in there. The sour oranges.

Motta
So the orange trees were pretty much abandoned then, ‘cause of the sour?

Jane
Yeah.

Leonard
Yeah, well, they liked the oak trees, and the competition we had…

Jane
Oak trees, yeah.

Leonard
Was from DeLand ferneries, and they’d grow theirs out in the woods, under the oak trees.

Jane
Out in Volusia [County].

Motta
So that was your father’s competition, the DeLand growers?

Leonard
Some of it was there.

Jane
We had local competition.

Leonard
Yeah, and then, so, we started buying oak trees. Dad put some of them on every lot that he was developing, and then we had planted some of them in ferneries, and so we had quite a few that were trees, but we didn’t replace the slats much again, and just let them grow under the trees. We could get them that way.

Jane
Well, we moved to Casselberry after he got out of the Navy, after World War II, and he had a piece of fernery that he’d inherited, from an aunt or something?

Leonard
Aunt May had left it to my brother and I, a couple acres of fernery, were on these development deals where they could have a house on it and so on, and Dad just leased those, so I said, “Well, can I lease those?” And Dad said, “Yeah, let me lease them.” So I’d be responsible for them, and I’d see about getting the fertilizer, mowing them, taking care of them. Had a crew working, just like big crews too. Yeah. Of course, in most cases they’re cutting fern or something like that, but they also had crews that they’d weed when they weren’t cutting. They’d go back to weeding or something else.

Motta
So that looks like a pretty big fernery. Was that about average size, or was this...

Leonard
No, that’s just one acre or so. There’d be several of those put together.

Jane
And he got, worked up all these florist customers, and we went through the Midwest, visiting and trying to get business.

Motta
So was that your primary business after you got out of the Navy?

Leonard
Probably for a little while. But Dad wanted us to go to the conventions, and we’d have to wear white.

Jane
Yeah, he always wore a white Palm Beach suit, or white with white jodhpurs or something, with a spray of fern on his lapel, and so when we were going with him to Chicago, to the convention, we had to have the white suits, too. With the fern.

Motta
And you didn’t care for those?

Jane
Oh, they were fine, except I got one and he said, “No, that wouldn’t do it.” It had to be like the Palm Beach kind of suit.

Motta
Wrong kind of fern?

Jane
So—went back and got some more—another outfit.

Motta
So you’ve lived in Casselberry since then? You haven’t lived anywhere else, moved anywhere?

Jane
Not since then.

Leonard
Well, we lived at the horse track for several years.

Motta
At the horse track?

Leonard
Yes.

Jane
Yes, see, soon after we moved to Casselberry, Mr. Casselberry acquired the Seminole Driving Park, and that was what, at the time, a winter training track for harness horses, and it was built about 1925, something like that, and then at time there was thoroughbred racing and different things. So here we were. We had no experience in this at all, and they’re a very closed community—the horsemen. But, so then he had to get the property ready, the barns fixed up and tack rooms, and came with it like a grandstand and a clubhouse. Well, his dad wanted him to run the clubhouse like an American plan hotel. So, as well as maintaining the track and everything, we had to go in the hotel business.

Motta
And that was...

Jane
And he was his early twenties, with—had to learn, like, experience…

Motta
As you’re going along?

Jane
Yeah, and he had to go up north to the horse sales to placate the horsemen that might have been upset about something that happened before we got it, and talk them into coming back, and then he would fix up the barns and do this and that. So.

Leonard
Of course, we didn’t know that when Dad—it’s adjacent to his property, and Dad bought it and he’d acquired some additional property to be able to develop part of. Says, “You can take care of the horses or I can.” So we were in there and trying to take care of it. When they sold it is when the horsemen had agreed with Ben White Raceway, which hadn’t started yet. They said Orlando told them, “We’ll build this half-mile track in Orlando if you’ll come down here, leave Seminole [County].” So they agreed to do that.

Jane
Well, we figured, at least we’ve got this guy Frank that’s a track man that would know what to do and knows the horsemen, and then he announces that he’s been hired to go to Ben White [laughs].

Motta
So they just stole it all away from...

Jane
Yeah [laughs].

Leonard
Well, they stayed just a little bit. We had some help getting up until they had to move to over there, on how to handle—we bought a jeep to drag the track with. Had a water wagon.

Jane
A clay track. Dirt track.

Motta
And was this all—were all these jobs—you were writing at the time?

Jane
I was not writing—well, I had been writing just local news for the area newspapers.

Motta
Like the Sanford newspaper?

Jane
But not full-time. So, his dad advertised it with an organization called “Ask Mr. Foster”, where you could—they send people to you, a travel service, you know, and so we were getting—here we were, and we had people, ninety-year-old women and eighty-year-old men, and then we had young families looking for excitement, and women looking for men. Whatever, you know [laughs]. Had all this variety, plus we had the horsemen to feed, and the grooms you’d have to feed like at five in the morning, before they went out to work the horses, and we’d have—they would be kind of rough, and would come and get drunk or something, and then we’d have these nice people [laughs] Oh, it was interesting.

Motta
Sounds interesting. So did you have any other jobs after that, or...

Jane
Well, in the summertime, we didn’t have the horses. About May, they would go up to the races, and sometimes you would have car races back then, before they had the Daytona…

Motta
[Daytona] 500?

Jane
They would have stock car races on that track.

Motta
And where was this located, the track located? In the…

Jane
You know where Seminola Boulevard is?

Motta
The same, where the…

Jane
Where they’re building apartments there now.

Motta
Oh, the big…

Jane
At the end of Seminola Boulevard.

Motta
Oh, yeah, the big field area.

Leonard
Yeah.

Jane
Yeah, all of that was our track property.

Motta
When did that go away, the track?

Jane
We had a one-mile track. After Mr. Casselberry sold his white elephant. He—it was various kinds of horse races with pari-mutuel betting, and then it was dog races. I mean, we had like a dog track on each end of Seminola.

Motta
So the track went away in the 70s or so, or, around then?

Jane
Well, a few years back, they closed down the dog track, and then they sold it to this developer. Well, actually, they sold it to Northland Church, and then Northland decided to expand on their present property on Dog Track [Road], and they sold it to the developer, and they’re still building and building, building.

Motta
Oh, wow. Well, learn something new every day.

Leonard
Yes.

Motta
So, your opinion on today’s Casselberry?

Leonard
Is it what?

Motta
Do you like it? Do you enjoy what the city is like now?

Leonard
Oh, yes. Of course, Dad had a lot of fun while it was happening.

Motta
Yeah. I know it was a lot different.

Leonard
He was working and sweating on a lot of it, some of it.

Motta
You think he would be proud of what it has become?

Leonard
Oh, yes.

Jane
I think so. Right now, it’s in kind of flux in major areas, business areas, because of those fly-overs.

Motta
Yeah, I actually live just about a half-mile from one of those—the construction site. So, yeah.

Jane
Yeah, they built—you know, they bought up property. But it’s just sitting there, and the business had to move, or close, or something. But we like the parks, what they’re doing with the parks. They’re beautiful, and people are using them.

Motta
Well, let’s see if we have any…

Jane
You asked what he did. He’s done a little bit of everything, but he worked for Casselberry Utilities many years. His father developed the sewer system that built the sewer plant and everything. That was the first sewer plant in Seminole County that really treated the sewage.

Leonard
Sanford had one. They just chewed it a little bit and dumped it in a lake.

Jane
Dumped it in Lake Monroe.

Leonard
[laughs].

Motta
Did your father own the utility company, or was that city by then?

Leonard
He owned it.

Jane
He owned it, and eventually it was sold to the city, and he continued to work for the city.

Leonard
For a short time.

Jane
For a time.

Leonard
Seven years. Not enough to get a retirement out of it.

Jane
And then after he retired, he went to work for the City of Winter Park Utilities, ‘til he was up in mid-seventies.

Motta
Oh, impressive.

Leonard
That’s a while back.

Jane
Yes, 87 now.

Motta
Oh, wow. Congratulations. Working into your mid-seventies, that’s admirable.

Jane
A lot of people can be doing that now [laughs].

Motta
Yeah, it’s admirable, though. Was there anything else you would like to discuss that we haven’t already? Any anecdotes or anything?

Leonard
Any more questions you have?

Motta
I think we covered a lot there.

Leonard
Yes, more than you want, probably.

Motta
Oh, no, this is great for me. All right. Well, thank you very much.


[1] Hibbard Casselberry.

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

Motta, Daniel

Interviewee

Casselberry, Leonard
Casselberry, Janes

Location

Locations

Categories