Browse Items (45 total)

  • Tags: Mercury

FSCH00137.jpg
Years after his historic Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, astronaut Gordon Cooper (1927-2004) autographed this photograph of himself for the U.S. Space Walk of Fame Museum in Titusville, Florida. During his Faith 7 flight, Cooper orbited the earth 22.5…

FSCH00129.jpg
The time capsule is located at the Mercury 7 Monument, which was placed at the entrance to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14). Contents of the time capsule are said to include John Glenn's (b. 1921) Marine Corps pilot wings,…

FSCH00127.jpg
Major General Ben Ivan Funk (1913-2012), of the U.S. Air Force, presents citations noting service to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space program to aerospace engineer T. J. Joseph O'Malley and Cape Canaveral Air Force…

FSCH00125.jpg
Gordon Cooper (1927-2004) completed his 22.5 orbit flight in the Faith 7 Mercury spacecraft by manually landing in the Pacific Ocean on May 16, 1963, closer than any other flight had landed with reference to the recovery ship. A dehydrated Cooper,…

FSCH00124.jpg
The stainless steel skin of an Atlas booster is displayed after recovery. This debris is suspected of being part of the Atlas used to boost John Glenn (b. 1921) with his Friendship 7 spacecraft into orbit. The skin is in such a degraded condition,…

FSCH00123.jpg
An Atlas core arriving at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Skid Strip. The core was flown from the manufacturer, Convair/General Dynamics, to Cape Canaveral, where it was unloaded and prepared for launch. This particular core was used for one…

FSCH00121.jpg
Gordon Cooper (1927-2004) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 launch manager Dr. Calvin D. Fowler sign the Atlas rocket, which would launch Faith 7 into orbit. Dr. Fowler and Cooper were at the General Dynamics/Astronautics…

FSCH00103.jpg
B. G. MacNabb, General Dynamics/Astronautics director of operations, greeting Mercury 7 astronaut Gordon Cooper (1927-2004) during a practice, the day before a launch was scrubbed or launch day at the launchpad at the Cape Canaveral Air Force…

FSCH00081.jpg
Astronaut Wally Schirra (1923-2007) named his boat Sigma 7, after the spacecraft which took him into orbit. In the photograph, Schirra shows the watercraft to General Dynamics/Astronautics director of operations B. G. MacNabb at what is believed to…

FSCH00080.jpg
Electronic equipment at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 Blockhouse, mounted in racks similar to the way modern computer servers are, was used to monitor the rocket during Project Mercury launches. Instead of digital readouts…

FSCH00079.jpg
tHE Launch Control Simulator at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 Blockhouse. This console likely allowed the launch team in Launch Complex 14's blockhouse to practice countdowns under simulated conditions. This could have…

FSCH00078.jpg
The television Control equipment at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 Blockhouse, mounted in racks similar to the way modern computer servers are, was used to monitor the rocket during Project Mercury launches. Instead of digital…

FSCH00077.jpg
Liquid oxygen tanking equipment at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14) Blockhouse, mounted in racks similar to the way modern computer servers are, was used to monitor the rocket during Project Mercury launches. Instead of…

FSCH00076.jpg
Launch Conductor Dr. Calvin D. Fowler posed for these publicity photographs on May 2, 1962, leading up to the launch of the Aurora 7 Mercury-Atlas 7 orbital mission, manned by Commander Scott Carpenter (1925-2013). These images are part of a…

FSCH00072.jpg
Launch Conductor Dr. Calvin D. Fowler posed for this publicity photograph on May 2, 1962, leading up tothe launch of the Aurora 7 Mercury-Atlas 7 orbital mission, manned by Commander Scott Carpenter (1925-2013). This image is part of a series of…

FSCH00070.jpg
Launch Conductor Dr. Calvin D. Fowler posed for these publicity photographs on May 2, 1962, leading up to the launch of the Aurora 7 Mercury-Atlas 7 orbital mission, manned by Commander Scott Carpenter (1925-2013). These images are part of a…

FSCH00059.jpg
Electronic equipment at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Cape Canaveral AFS) Launch Complex 14 (LC-14) blockhouse, mounted in racks similar to the way modern computer servers are, was used to monitor the rocket during Project Mercury launches.…

FSCH00033.jpg
Electronic equipment at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Cape Canaveral AFS) Launch Complex 14 (LC-14) blockhouse. The equipment was mounted in racks similar to the way modern computer servers are and was used to monitor the rocket during…

FSCH00032.jpg
During a launch of a Mercury-Atlas mission, these workstations were occupied by workers who monitored critical systems on the rocket and maintained lines of communications with essential locations around the world. Instead of digital readouts and big…

FSCH00030.jpg
Dr. Calvin D. Fowler seated at the launch conductor's console in the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (Cape Canaveral AFS) Launch Complex 14 (LC-14) blockhouse for Mercury-Atlas launch. Fowler would conduct the final three Project Mercury launches…

FSCH00028.jpg
After Gordon Cooper (1927-2004)'s Mercury-Atlas 9 mission (MA-9), Alan Shepard's (1923-1998) scheduled Project Mercury's Mercury-Atlas 10 mission (MA-10) was canceled. Shepard wrote to Dr. Calvin D. Fowler, the manager and the Launch Conductor…

FSCH00026.jpg
Wally Schirra (1923-2007) was the fifth American astronaut in space and the third to orbit the Earth. On October 3, 1962, Dr. Calvin D. Fowler, who was the manager and launch conductor for Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14),…

FSCH00024.jpg
Dr. Calvin D. Fowler, T. J. O'Malley (1915-2009) and others observing Mercury-Atlas 9 (MA-9)'s spacecraft, Faith 7, for Project Mercury. Faith 7 was piloted by Gordon Cooper (1927-2004), on May 15, 1963. After the launch, the team assembled in the…

FSCH00021.jpg
Gordon Cooper (1927-2004) was the sixth American in space and the fourth to orbit the Earth. Cooper flew in the Faith 7 spacecraft for Project Mercury. At the time, he was in space for 34 hours, longer than any American. With his second space flight…

FSCH00018.jpg
Dr. Calvin D. Fowler with others at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14). Dr. Fowler is photographed second from the right. Dr. Fowler was the manager of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 during the final…

FSCH00016.jpg
The Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14) Blockhouse was where Mercury-Atlas rockets were launched using analog electronic equipment to monitor various aspects of the rocket. One might note that these Project Mercury…

FSCH00007.jpg
Used during the launches of the Mercury-Atlas rockets—from the first American to orbit earth, John Glenn (b. 1921), to the last Project Mercury flight with Gordon Cooper (1927-2004), Jr.—this was one of the workstations in the blockhouse at…

FSCH00006.jpg
The Launch Tote Board at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14) detailed the rocket launches carried out at the facility. Posted outside of the blockhouse, it showed the vehicle type, designation and launch date.

FSCH00003.jpg
Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 14 (LC-14), where some of the United States' first astronauts were launched into space, had a heavily built concrete and steel blockhouse which housed the actual rocket firing button. This blockhouse…

FSCH00002.jpg
High-profile projects, such as Project Mercury, typically get a great deal of attention from Presidential Administrations. This presidential visit occurred on September 11, 1962, a month before the fifth Mercury flight. President John F. Kennedy…